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Przewalski's Horse

Przewalski's Horse

acrylic on board
40x60cm

2011

 

Sold

Exist

Exist

acrylic polymer on board
51x118cm

2010

 

Sold

 

This Way > Gaffa, Sydney 2010
Catalogue essay, Jack Randell. 

A gold anodised aluminium plaque is attached to the Pioneer 10 spacecraft. On it are graphic representations of what we understand to be our location in the universe and our physical features as a species. Pioneer was launched with no known destination. We lost its signal some years ago already. The plaque is a declaration of our existence, a message in a bottle if you like, to other life forms.

The male figure holds aloft his open palm as a peaceful greeting.

 

In the stairwell at the back of Artspace in Sydney someone drew an ‘s’ on the exit sign, bending the code from absence to presence.

 

After sharing a demonstration of our respective calligraphic styles, the Rev. Sogen Yamakawa, Head Master of Shogenji Institute of Zen Practice, Minokamo, Japan gave me a piece depicting silence. Silence can be of knowing calm or of unconsciousness; the silence of being quietly present or of my departure. Master Sogen’s character was of the former.

 

In the expanding pressure of our way of life on this planet we are at the acutely poignant moment of examining our existence and extinction with the same visionary tools. Do you suppose there is a fragment of DNA on the Pioneer craft as it passes silently into the infinite unknown? Do you suppose that in the moment of its arrival into the next divine spark that the whole evolutionary process starts again? And even if this suggestion is a vanity consistent with the design of the gold anodised plaque, then maybe we should read the action of the male figure not as a greeting, but as goodbye.

Trunks RGB

Trunks RGB

pastel, coloured pencil on digital print on paper
301x102cm ea

2007

 

$3300

Eurydice and the Red Bellied Black Snake

Eurydice and the Red Bellied Black Snake

acrylic and human hair on printed linen 

155x120cm

2008

 

Finalist, Kilgour Prize, Newcastle Regional Gallery

$3300

Hill Near Geurie

Hill Near Geurie

acrylic and polyester on board  
238x395cm
15 panels 79x79cm

2007

 

Sold

 

Light and Shade

Simryn Gill
Catalogue essay, Fishdogwood, Carriageworks, Sydney 2008

You could say that making a painting of something, a place, or landscape, demands a long, slow look, while taking a photograph of the same needs only a brief second.  A painting wants to remake light on a surface; photographs are made from light falling on surfaces. Jack Randell, in his painted photographs, and projected paintings brings both ways of looking onto a single plane.  But in doing this, he crosses their wires: he confuses them, he mixes them up and swaps their languages. 

 

In his hands and through his eyes, photographs are made from long, slow, deep, looking and paintings become projected light. He draws us into thinking about how long a look it takes to see clearly. His picture paintings made me think about light as we might think about language. How do we learn a new light?  

 

Recently, a friend who was visiting Wales described the green of the countryside as 'blinding' in a postcard she sent me.  After nearly 12 years in Sydney, I still long for the egg-yolk light of the equatorial afternoons of Malaysia. Jack Randell showed me that the dark pools of shade under trees and awnings in the nuclear-fusion light of Australian summers is purple in the local language, and not the impenetrable smoky black of my untrained translation. 

 

Euchareena

Euchareena

acrylic and printed polyester on board
39.5x59.5cm

2006

 

$1100

Infinity (after Bernard Frize)

Infinity (after Bernard Frize)

acrylic on board

40x45cm

2014

 

$550

Kangaroo Ahead

Kangaroo Ahead

acrylic polymers on board

60 x 60cm

2010

 

Sold

Black Snake at the Shearing Shed

Black Snake at the Shearing Shed

acrylic on composition board
122x103cm

2014

 

Sold

Territory

Territory

acrylic on composition board
57.5 x 59.5cm

2014

 

$1100

Przewalski's Horse

acrylic on board
40x60cm

2011

 

Sold

Exist

acrylic polymer on board
51x118cm

2010

 

Sold

 

This Way > Gaffa, Sydney 2010
Catalogue essay, Jack Randell. 

A gold anodised aluminium plaque is attached to the Pioneer 10 spacecraft. On it are graphic representations of what we understand to be our location in the universe and our physical features as a species. Pioneer was launched with no known destination. We lost its signal some years ago already. The plaque is a declaration of our existence, a message in a bottle if you like, to other life forms.

The male figure holds aloft his open palm as a peaceful greeting.

 

In the stairwell at the back of Artspace in Sydney someone drew an ‘s’ on the exit sign, bending the code from absence to presence.

 

After sharing a demonstration of our respective calligraphic styles, the Rev. Sogen Yamakawa, Head Master of Shogenji Institute of Zen Practice, Minokamo, Japan gave me a piece depicting silence. Silence can be of knowing calm or of unconsciousness; the silence of being quietly present or of my departure. Master Sogen’s character was of the former.

 

In the expanding pressure of our way of life on this planet we are at the acutely poignant moment of examining our existence and extinction with the same visionary tools. Do you suppose there is a fragment of DNA on the Pioneer craft as it passes silently into the infinite unknown? Do you suppose that in the moment of its arrival into the next divine spark that the whole evolutionary process starts again? And even if this suggestion is a vanity consistent with the design of the gold anodised plaque, then maybe we should read the action of the male figure not as a greeting, but as goodbye.

Trunks RGB

pastel, coloured pencil on digital print on paper
301x102cm ea

2007

 

$3300

Eurydice and the Red Bellied Black Snake

acrylic and human hair on printed linen 

155x120cm

2008

 

Finalist, Kilgour Prize, Newcastle Regional Gallery

$3300

Hill Near Geurie

acrylic and polyester on board  
238x395cm
15 panels 79x79cm

2007

 

Sold

 

Light and Shade

Simryn Gill
Catalogue essay, Fishdogwood, Carriageworks, Sydney 2008

You could say that making a painting of something, a place, or landscape, demands a long, slow look, while taking a photograph of the same needs only a brief second.  A painting wants to remake light on a surface; photographs are made from light falling on surfaces. Jack Randell, in his painted photographs, and projected paintings brings both ways of looking onto a single plane.  But in doing this, he crosses their wires: he confuses them, he mixes them up and swaps their languages. 

 

In his hands and through his eyes, photographs are made from long, slow, deep, looking and paintings become projected light. He draws us into thinking about how long a look it takes to see clearly. His picture paintings made me think about light as we might think about language. How do we learn a new light?  

 

Recently, a friend who was visiting Wales described the green of the countryside as 'blinding' in a postcard she sent me.  After nearly 12 years in Sydney, I still long for the egg-yolk light of the equatorial afternoons of Malaysia. Jack Randell showed me that the dark pools of shade under trees and awnings in the nuclear-fusion light of Australian summers is purple in the local language, and not the impenetrable smoky black of my untrained translation. 

 

Euchareena

acrylic and printed polyester on board
39.5x59.5cm

2006

 

$1100

Infinity (after Bernard Frize)

acrylic on board

40x45cm

2014

 

$550

Kangaroo Ahead

acrylic polymers on board

60 x 60cm

2010

 

Sold

Black Snake at the Shearing Shed

acrylic on composition board
122x103cm

2014

 

Sold

Territory

acrylic on composition board
57.5 x 59.5cm

2014

 

$1100

Przewalski's Horse
Exist
Trunks RGB
Eurydice and the Red Bellied Black Snake
Hill Near Geurie
Euchareena
Infinity (after Bernard Frize)
Kangaroo Ahead
Black Snake at the Shearing Shed
Territory